050 - Fig1

PHRC050 : Dedication to Arsinoe Philadelphos, Eretria - Euboea (270-240 BC) Dedication

This small plaque is the only specimen of dedication for Arsinoe Philadelphos from Euboea and from the western coast of the Aegean Sea. It probably belonged to a small altar used for the household cult of the deified queen, as suggested by its find spot which is situated within a Hellenistic house in the western neighbourhood of Eretria.

Images

Photo 1: Photo of the stone, from Reber et al. 1998, photo 141
Photo 2: Plan of the Hellenistic House IV, from Reber et al. 1998, photo 138, with indication of the find spot of the inscription
Photo 3: Plan of the western neighbourhood of Eretria, Reber et al. 1998, photo 2
Photo 4: Aerial photo of the western neighbourhood of Eretria, from Reber et al. 1998, photo 3
Photo 5: Plan of the archaeological site of Eretria, from Reber et al. 1998, photo 1


Current location

Unknown

Support

Object Type: Slab
Complete, with worn-out edges
Material: Limestone
Dimensions:
Height: 18 cm
Width: 20 cm
Depth: cm

Layout

Text written in two lines occupying the upper part of the writing surface.
Clear, although somewhat cursorily cut letters, averagely of the same size, except for O which is smaller. Letter shape of the reign of Ptolemy II. A with horizontal, slightly bowed bar, Σ with diverging hastae, Φ with a slightly flattened circle. The hastae of N are somewhat curvy. Thickening at the end of hastae without apices.
Average letter height of 1.5 cm.

History

Date: Between 270 and 240 BC
Justification: Lettering and formulary
Provenance: Found in 1989 during the excavations of the southern section of the Hellenistic House IV, in the western neighrbourhood of Eretria. The stone was discovered in a small corridor between the 'Room with the well' and the 'Corner-room', in a point where the floor was broken.

Bibliography

Text constituted from: Reber 1990, p. 113 (SEG XL 763).

Other editions:

See also: Reber et al. 1998, p. 87.

Images: Reber et al. 1998, photo 141; Caneva 2014a, no. 57; Caneva 2020.

Further bibliography: Reber et al. 1998 on the Hellenistic houses of Eretria.

Online record:

Edition



Ἀρσινόης
Φιλαδέλφου


Translation


(S. Caneva)
Of Arsinoe Philadelphos

Traduzione


(S. Caneva)
Di Arsinoe Philadelphos

Traduction


(S. Caneva)
D'Arsinoé Philadelphos

Commentary

This limestone plaque provides the only known specimen of a genitive dedication for Arsinoe Philadelphos from Euboea and, more generally, from the western coast of the Aegean Sea. This type of small plaque was attached to a cult facility, probably a small altar, to clarify that it belonged to the cult of the deified Ptolemaic queen. The interest of this dedication is that it was discovered during the excavation of the Hellenistic House IV, in the western neighbourhood of Eretria, pointing to a probable context of domestic cult for the queen. The household cult of Arsinoe II is well known in Alexandria, for which see in particular the fragment of a ritual regulation concerning the procession of Arsinoe Philaldephos quoted by Satyrus (P.Oxy. XXVII 2465, fr. 2), with commentary in Robert 1966; Caneva 2014a; Caneva 2020.

Author:
Stefano Caneva, on 19.12.2019
Revisions:
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Travocial - Social Travel & Storytelling Practicalities of Hellenistic Ruler Cults
Marie Curie PISCOPIA project no. PISC14IGRU, University of Padova (2015-2017)
FNRS project no. 98368 (2017-2020)
Stefano Caneva
ste.caneva@gmail.com
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The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission, Seventh Framework Programme, under Grant Agreement n° 600376 (2015-2017), and from the Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique (FNRS), Belgium (2017-2020).
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